Diving In

This week I self published my first book. This  was not something I took lightly and took me years to come to this. I finally came to a point I either needed to dive in or swim away. Even after my book was edited and the cover was made, I sat on this project for a few months.

I’ve tried going the traditional route to get published, and I still will. I have enough rejections to fill my bedroom to the ceiling. Don’t get me wrong, rejection sucks but it’s part of the process. I have gotten some feedback on my rejections which is helpful. It’s better than getting no response at all. Taking criticism is part of becoming a better writer.

I went into this journey as a learning one, and I hope to grow from it. Self publishing is not easy. There are very few that become an overnight success, and I’ve gone into this knowing I will get nothing back in return. I’ve had fun and am viewing it as working towards a goal.

It is nice to have a finished work under my belt. I have a few other projects I’m working on and hope to submit to some publishers soon. Is anyone else going through the same process? Tell me your experience with self publishing or going the traditional route.

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Trends

One problem with getting published is trends. What is popular? What are readers craving? There’s a lot of discussion if writers should follow trends or not. I can’t write something based off a trend. So if unicorns riding Segways becomes a must in stories, you won’t see me writing it.

It does makes sense why good stories get rejected. Maybe the topic was all the rage two years ago, but now the market is saturated, and everyone else is sick of it. It’s time to move on to something else.

I’ve found a good way to identify trends is reading Literary Agents requests when submitting books. This may not always be the case, but I wonder if it’s because they’re going off what readers want or what will become popular. There’s no way to predict what will be a best seller, but one can try to be proactive in that aspect.

Anyone else have input on this? What are your thoughts?

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The Wall

I think every writer comes to a point where they hit the dreaded wall. It happens to me all the time. For example, last week I had brilliant ideas for my stories. I’d wake up excited to write and ended up writing over 12,000 words this last week. That’s quite a lot for me. Except yesterday, I tried to write and nothing appeared on screen. I found myself checking Twitter or watching YouTube videos.

It’s frustrating when the creativity disappears, to have it one day gone like it never existed. When this happens, I have to take a step back and reevaluate. A few things that help are hitting the gym, watching a movie or reading a book. Another helpful thing is listening to movie soundtracks depending on the mood I want to achieve. I try to find something to inspire and motivate me.

One thing I’ve learned is trying to write when stressed is never a good thing; it leads to more frustration. The most important thing is to not let it get to you, don’t quit trying. take a day off if you need to, but then get back on the horse. I’m sure many of you have heard this quote, but it’s a nice reminder to keep pushing.

“If you can quit, then quit. If you can’t quit, you’re a writer.” R.A. Salvatore.

I want to be a writer and the more I work towards my goal, it becomes true. I’m to the point where I can’t quit, where I need to see it through to the end. Even when I hit that dreaded wall, I’m going to take my imaginary bulldozer and knock it on over.

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Genres

Do you only write one genre? What’s your favorite? Mine are horror, suspense, paranormal and romance. I can’t stick to just one.

Truth is, I get bored easily. Some days I’m working on a romance, and then I want something to freak me out. It flip-flops all the time, usually everyday. If you’ve checked out the Books I’m Reading, posts, you can see that.

Many authors are known for a specific type of book they write. Stephen King writes horror and then Nicolas Sparks writes feel good, romance novels. I wonder if this will hinder me. My mind goes too many directions, and it’s hard to focus on one topic for too long. They all have my voice and style, but is that enough?

From what I’ve read, much of it has to do with marketing. I understand the end goal is to make money (for publishers). They hardly care about the creative process or hindering yours, at least that’s how I view it. Publishers stick with an author to keep readers coming back for more. 

What if a best selling thriller writer wants to write erotica, would some roll their eyes? Would they let them try it out? This is a topic I will dive into, with upcoming posts. 

Does anyone else branch out and write different work? What are your thoughts on writing different genres?

 

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